Aerodynamics for Engineers, by John J. Bertin

By John J. Bertin

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NACA Tech. Report R-50 Hillaker H. 1997. Tribute to John R. Boyd. Code One Magazine 12(3) Moeckel WE, Weston KC. 1958. Composition and thermodynamic properties of air in chemical equilibrium. NACA Tech. Note 4265 Svehla RA. 1962. Estimated viscosities and thermal conductivities of gases at high temperatures. Report R-132 1976. S. Standard Atmosphere. S. Government Printing Office Werner J. 2005. Knight of Germany: Oswald Boelcke – German Ace. Mechanicsburg: Stackpole Books Yos JM. 1963. Transport properties of nitrogen, hydrogen, oxygen, and air to 30,000 K.

NACA Tech. Note 4265 Svehla RA. 1962. Estimated viscosities and thermal conductivities of gases at high temperatures. Report R-132 1976. S. Standard Atmosphere. S. Government Printing Office Werner J. 2005. Knight of Germany: Oswald Boelcke – German Ace. Mechanicsburg: Stackpole Books Yos JM. 1963. Transport properties of nitrogen, hydrogen, oxygen, and air to 30,000 K. AVCO Corp. RAD-TM-63-7 2 FUNDAMENTALS OF FLUID MECHANICS Chapter Objectives • Understand the physical laws that form the basis of the fluid equations of motion • Learn how to obtain the equations of fluid motion in both derivative and integral form • Be able to apply the equations of motion to calculate properties of fluid flows • Understand dynamic similarity and how to calculate Mach number and Reynolds number • Understand the various Mach and Reynolds number regimes and their distinguishing characteristics As we discussed in Chapter 1, to accurately predict the aerodynamic forces and moments that act on a vehicle in flight, we will need to be able to describe the pattern of flow around the configuration.

Substituting these derivatives into the continuity equation results in: 0u 0v + = 2 - 2 = 0 0x 0y Therefore, mass is conserved for this flow field. We will examine this flow field in more detail in Chapter 3. , a free-stream flow) approaches a flat plate. In the viscous region near the surface, which is called the boundary layer and is Sec. 2. discussed at length in Chapter 4, the streamwise component of velocity is given by y 1>7 u = Uϱ a b d where d, the boundary-layer thickness at a given station, is a function of x.

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